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Padre Pedro Red, Casa Cadaval - 2015

Item # 12974 750mL
$9.96/ Single Bottle
$119.52 $107.57/ Case of 12
You Save 10%
Color
Red
Vintage
Country
Region
Producer

Tasting Notes

The vines for this Portuguese wine grow 60 km north of Lisbon, in the region of Ribatejo. This is a more internationally styled wine, made from a blend based mostly on indigenous Portuguese varieties with a dash of Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Giving on the palate.


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Astor's Glossary of Terms

Merlot

The next time you hear someone say they never touch Merlot, tell them that it's too bad, because you were just about to open a few bottles of Château Pétrus and Le Pin, and you have no one to share them with. Some wine drinkers are quick to dismiss varieties that become too fashionable, but Merlot is popular for good reason. It has one of the most impressive and distinctive textures of any wine,...

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Tempranillo

A.k.a. Cencibel. Just about synonymous with Spanish wine, the red Tempranillo grape has now fully won over the hearts and minds of critics and amateur oenophiles all over the world. The best bottles are powerful and ageworthy, and are beginning to fetch prices you'd never have expected from Spanish wines just a few years ago. Tempranillo is often used in blends with Bordeaux grapes such as...

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Cabernet Sauvignon

The result of an illicit affair a hundred-odd years ago between Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon today enjoys more worldwide popularity than both of its parents combined. It is the principal grape of Bordeaux, and as such has rightly earned its place among the greatest and most long-lived wines of the Old World; of course, it is also the most heralded grape of California,...

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Portugal

The Dão and the Douro are the most important regions as far as red Portuguese table wine is concerned. Douro wines tend to be a bit fuller and fleshier than their Dão counterparts, which are generally lighter and higher in acidity. Reds from both regions are dense, rustic, and well-balanced. They also show their terroir quite clearly, and represent a great alternative to the modern fruit-driven...

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